AT decides on Section 4 of Glen Innes to Tamaki Drive

AT decides on Section 4 of Glen Innes to Tamaki DriveIt’s been a long time coming, but on the 4th of August, Auckland Transport at last announced its preferred route for Section 4 of the Glen Innes to Tamaki Shared Path (GI2TD). The immediate response from much of the bike community was ‘…huh?’ The decision-making process had been, as far as the public was concerned, a black box – so, naturally, everyone is eager to know how and why the choice was made. This blog post is a placeholder: we plan to host a public meeting in early September to allow AT to present fully on the plan for Section 4, along with two directly linked projects. The big picture …
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Quickblog: Carry on on Carrington Road

Quickblog: Carry on on Carrington RoadDoing the rounds of AT’s website, we found this short but useful bit of new protected cycle lane coming for the Pt Chev community: AT is proposing to install what looks like St Lukes-style separators on Carrington Road, on the southbound section from the Pt Chev town centre and across the motorway bridge, as far south as Sutherland Road (i.e. to the Northwestern Cycleway entry!). Sadly, this quick fix project doesn’t extend any further down Carrington Rd, because the lanes get a lot narrower south of Sutherland Road and then swing out around parked cars outside Gladstone Primary. Despite the obvious limitations, we think this is a good quick improvement …
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‘Dynamic’ – or dinosaur? AT’s Whangaparaoa experiment

'Dynamic' – or dinosaur? AT's Whangaparaoa experimentAT is patting itself on the back for being smart with technology: they’re planning to squeeze an extra lane into a road currently painted for two opposing lanes with long flush medians, by using on-ground lights and overhead gantries to allow cars to drive along the flush median at peak times. Like the ‘zipper’ device on the Harbour Bridge, this reversible middle lane is a technique for accommodating tidal flows of morning and evening traffic. The lucky location for the first trial of this dynamic lane technology, which will run for a year and a half, is the landward end of Whangaparaoa Rd, which runs along the spine of the …
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Bike to the future: a 10 year plan for cycling in Auckland

Bike to the future: a 10 year plan for cycling in AucklandRemember when Auckland had a paltry $5 million across 3 years to spend on all improvements for walking AND cycling across the entire city? Us neither! Those bad old days seem eons ago – yet it was only in 2015 that the Urban Cycleways Programme (UCP) unlocked extra funding and kickstarted the bike boom, the effects of which we’re just starting to see. Now, Auckland Transport along with the NZ Transport Agency and Auckland Council, is looking a decade into the future with an investment business case for cycling investment 2018-2028. Yesterday, the AT Board formally approved it. The guts: a proposed combined investment of $600million over the next 10 years …
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Bike to the future – taking the long view on the Pt Chev bike lanes

Bike to the future - taking the long view on the Pt Chev bike lanesPart 1 in a short series on the planned walking and biking improvements for Pt Chevalier. Feedback closes Sunday 23 April – read about the proposal here, and have your say ASAP!  I love Pt Chev for many reasons – not least, because it’s literally got a point: it’s a near-perfect triangle, about as wide as it is tall, leading to a tree-clad promontory into the harbour. I love that you can walk it end to end in half an hour, or dip in and out of the cul-de-sacs to rack up your 10,000 steps. I love the way local kids can learn all the streets. I love the grey herons and magpies who shout at each other in …
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All cycleways are not created equal: or, when to say yeah-nah

All cycleways are not created equal: or, when to say yeah-nahSimon Wilson at The Spinoff has written a cracker of a piece about the East-West Link, the Onehunga roading project currently facing a Board of Inquiry at the Environment Court to see if it will be allowed to be fast-tracked. Of the extremely large number of public submissions (you can see the analysis here), the vast majority (85%) oppose the plan. Simon’s article is a pretty great round-up of why. Among other things, the projected $1.85bn budget could go a long way towards all sorts of other transport projects that would help Auckland, including the rail and bus network. Or imagine, for example, investing that same sum in a cogent network of connected cycleways, protected bike lanes, wide smooth footpaths, and traffic-calmed safer streets in …
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Hot stuff: Auckland’s secret to cycling success

Hot stuff: Auckland's secret to cycling successHave you noticed the magnificent blast of publicity for our glorious pink path, Te Ara i Whiti/ Lightpath, over the past week? Just as we were becoming a bit blase about seeing our sexy, sleek lick of colour in magazines and papers, the latest deluge of images reminds us that Lightpath is now a defining element of an emerging new edgy Auckland. The Herald kicked off the recent run of publicity, triggered by the Path’s success as a supreme winner in this year’s Best Design Awards. It scooped the Spatial Purple Pin (only few months after winning an international architectural honour for the Canada St bridge). As I was still basking in the glow …
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Signs of the times – your feedback needed

Signs of the times - your feedback neededFollowing your nose can be a great way to get creatively lost on a bike and find things you weren’t looking for. But it can be a less than successful strategy if you’re just trying to get from A to B on time – and especially while safe new networks are still in the process of being built and connected. That’s why it’s good to know Auckland Transport is currently trialling some new way finding designs for cycleways. (Ed note: ‘Wayfinding’ is the technical term for the whole range of possible clues and strategies to help people orient themselves and discover routes and destinations – from good old maps and signs and signposts, to almost subliminal pointers written or drawn on the ground, …
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The Island Bay Cycleway – Terribly Important and Nothing New

The Island Bay Cycleway – Terribly Important and Nothing NewProfessor Alistair Woodward, from the School of Population Health at Auckland University, takes a look at the heated discussion around Wellington’s newest cycleway… and discover it’s deja vu all over again. (This article reposted with kind permission of Otago University’s Public Health Expert blog.) This is a sensible move to make the city safer and more attractive for carbon-sparing, health-promoting bicycling, according to some. Unnecessary and disruptive and not wanted by most people, argue others. The debate over the Island Bay cycleway is important because the way we build our streets shapes how we live, and consequently determines the health and well-being of populations. But it is nothing new. The Island Bay story …
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Time to get cross… on Upper Queen Street

Time to get cross... on Upper Queen StreetAs Auckland builds more inner-city cycleways, it’s crucial to link them up and make getting on and off as easily as possible. A decade ago, it was pretty well “accepted” that to get to a “safe cycleway” (if there was one on your route at all) you had to run a gauntlet of streets and turns and intersections that could be anywhere from really inconvenient to utterly hair-rising. The last bits were often the worst. Many still are (I am looking at YOU, Newton Road! And YOU, Parnell Rise!). One key area of our emerging network is at the southern end of the City Centre, on Upper Queen St – especially …
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Can busways and cycleways exist together?

Can busways and cycleways exist together?In recent years, Bike Auckland has noticed a troubling trend: When long-term plans for road upgrades are drawn up, the planners and engineers trying to allocate space for moving cars, parked cars, pedestrians, public transport and bikes often decide that bikes are (still) the ones that can be left out of the equation most easily. Many key urban arterials – on which we desperately need dedicated, protected bike lanes – are also public transport routes of great importance. And we have seen cycling squeezed out on a number of strategic route plans over the last year or two, such as on Manukau Road. These Auckland Transport-internal documents called CMPs (Corridor Management …
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A year of revolutions – 2015 bike highlights in review!

A year of revolutions - 2015 bike highlights in review!2015 was a phenomenal year for Auckland bike culture. Things are really changing, inexorably and permanently. Our utopian hearts want citywide revolution NOW (if we could only wave a wand and create bikeable streets everywhere, right this minute!) – but optimistic and pragmatic minds are excited to see the seeds of transformation firmly planted, and growing. It’s the culmination of many voices and hands over the years. To put it in a visual nutshell, here’s a BEFORE pic (image via Google Streetview) of where Nelson St crosses Cook St: And here’s the AFTER of the same spot. Photo by Tim Duguid, mid-afternoon, mid-week, mid-January, mid-city, mid bike revolution: We could leave it at that, but that wouldn’t do justice to the major highlights of the year …
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Simon says: for a new city, on your bike (or hop a bus, or take a stroll)

Simon says: for a new city, on your bike (or hop a bus, or take a stroll)Pick up any copy of Metro magazine, and you’ll find a persuasive, passionate piece (or two) by Simon Wilson, longtime editor and now editor-at-large, who always finds a fresh way to put the spotlight on people and places doing interesting things. Keep reading, and you’ll find that all those articles – no matter what their ostensible subject – add up to a beguiling vision of Auckland as a city that’s not just ‘liveable’, but potentially truly spectacular. This month, for example, by way of introduction to a restaurant review Simon unleashes a glorious rant about the most Auckland of topics: traffic. I know, you want to read about the restaurant. But I need to get something off my chest first. It’s …
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I see your Auckland protected lane… and raise you a Copenhagen one

I see your Auckland protected lane... and raise you a Copenhagen oneA little while ago, one of our at-times-supporters-at-times-critics expressed frustration on social media about why New Zealand keeps insisting on “trialling” cycle infrastructure that is well-established overseas. Instead of responding with the usual answers (legal factors, our drivers not being used to such infrastructure, etc), this time we responded with what we think is the (other) real reason: It’s to get Kiwis who aren’t reading cycling blogs – and who haven’t cycled overseas either – used to these “new” things. In other words, trialling new designs is a way of convincing the doubters. By trialling things, you’re not simply “testing” how they work, but engineering acceptance that they work. Among funders, designers, politicians – decision-makers most …
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Devonporters – what’s your spin on the proposed new roundabout?

Devonporters - what's your spin on the proposed new roundabout?Auckland Transport are proposing to redesign the Victoria Rd/Calliope Rd intersection in Devonport as a roundabout, and are seeking public feedback (due date is Thursday 5 November). You can read all about it on AT’s website, but here’s what the new design looks like: We first blogged on this back in September last year, and then recently we posted Cycle Action’s hastily constructed submission, only to find later the closing date for submissions had been extended.  Thanks AT! What this means is that if you live in or cycle through Devonport, you still have an opportunity to have your say, and we’d encourage you to do so. Now, we’re not going to …
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