These yellow broken lines now won't be removed anymore - and new cycle lanes will get them again.
These yellow broken lines now won’t be removed anymore – and new cycle lanes will get them again.

Great news in one of the more formalistic – but crucial – aspects of Auckland cycleway infrastructure: Auckland Transport have reviewed, and changed, their attititude to no stopping markings in cycle lanes (also known as “broken yellow lines” or BYLs).

As you may already have heard, AT had recently adopted a policy that since it was already illegal to park in a cycle lane, such BYLs should NOT be marked in cycle lanes, as this would be doubling up, and thus inconsistent. For new cycle lane projects, such markings would not be added, and in old cycle lanes, they would progressively be removed.

This decision created great frustration among us and especially among those of us who had fought hard for BYLs to fix existing parking issues in cycle lanes. Both ourselves and Transport blog described issues we had with the way cycle lane markings in Auckland were often not up to spec – and how the lack of BYLs, far from improving consistency to motorists, only seemed to lead to more drivers parking in cycle lanes. After all, no stopping markings weren’t being removed everywhere: just in cycle lanes.

A New Zealand-wide review of cycling design guidance currently being undertaken by the NZTA also pointed out the question of marking or not marking BYLs in cycle lanes, and seemed to lean on the side of providing them – providing greater clarity to drivers.

In a positive move, Auckland Transport agreed to meet with Cycle Action and Transport Blog reps to discuss the various concerns we expressed. And in an even better move (and quite fast too), we now have the following decision:

Following our meeting two weeks ago we have agreed a process for ensuring cyclelanes in our network are fit for purpose and consistent.  We will be requiring the following from now:

– setting a new standard for marking cycle lanes which mandates the use of broken yellow lines.
– requiring that for maintenance of streets that include cycle lanes, as well as construction of new cycle lanes, the cycle symbols are marked when the lane markings are done rather than waiting for the greening to be applied.

In order to bring the current network up to standard we will be:
– reviewing all cycle lanes to ensure the markings are correct and that they have all required resolutions.
– developing a priority list of cyclelanes to bring up to standard.
– requiring the above be implemented on lower priority routes when routine maintenance occurs.

To help imbed these changes once we complete our review and priority location treatment we will:
– run an information campaign.
– develop a more robust education and information campaign for construction of new cyclelanes.
– work with our Parking team to enforce priority cycle lanes.

Thumbs Up Sign ATThis is great stuff, Auckland Transport – thank you.

We will work with Auckland Transport in the coming period as they develop their implementation and education programme.

One of the key actions needs to be putting the no stopping lines (back) in on Upper Harbour Drive and on the recent South Auckland cycle lanes such as Puhinui Road.

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8 responses to “Hold the (yellow) line – Auckland Transport moves on cycle lane markings

      1. How will that help? If the public don’t know they are not allowed to park on a cycle lane, I’m not sure whether the cycle symbol being white, yellow, pink, or brown is going to change their behavior?

        I expect either a public education program, or use of the standard “no parking” symbology that drivers already understand (ie. broken yellow lines), or preferably both, are the most likely things to work.

      2. There’s also the small matter that a legal cycle lane must be denoted by WHITE cycle symbols so, yellow lines or no yellow lines, anyone could drive along a cycle lane with yellow symbols.

  1. The law apart from the yellow line will stay the same and motor vehicles must not wander into the lane as we often see. They can only enter the lane up to 50 metres as a crossing manoeuvre to enter a side road or driveway

  2. Where’s the little fella with the bus lane camera when you need him?
    Looks like there is yellow lines here at st lukes (I think they’re under the cars) but didn’t help today when motorway traffic was parked in the bike lane.
    Gives me an idea about how to fund bike projects! 😉

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