Northcote Electorate

VOTE BIKE 2017

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Jonathan Coleman – NATIONAL

Hon Jonathan Coleman, MP, is running for National in the Northcote electorate.

[Note: Responses were given verbally during a meeting at Jonathan Coleman’s Northcote office with two of our team; we’ve summarised them here, with quotes where possible.]

More kids on bikesCurrently only 2% of Kiwi kids ride a bike to school. Is lifting this number a priority? If so, how will we get there?

Jonathan Coleman thinks it’s great for more kids to cycle to school. He is in favour of allowing kids to ride on the footpath and sees shared paths as the key to providing safe cycling infrastructure.

 

Bike-friendly citiesWhat would you do to make it easier for Aucklanders (in your electorate, and beyond) to choose bike travel?

This question led to a discussion of the contentious environment around Skypath and the Northcote Safe Cycle Route. Jonathan felt that residents have had to put up with a lot of disruption, with various entities digging the streets up for a variety of reasons over the last couple of years. This has lead to a lowering of tolerance to change and disruption.

Asked about the health outcomes from people using bikes for short trips, he felt that it made sense and believed that sustainable exercise was the key to positive health outcomes. He supports regular, moderate exercise through commuting and utility cycling to increase healthy living.

 

Safer streets

How would you make streets (in your electorate and beyond) safer for everyone who uses them, including those on bikes?

Jonathan thinks raising awareness is the key. In particular: using signage to raise the awareness of other road users, making drivers aware of the zone they are driving in, and ensuring that drivers understand what driving in a residential zone entails.

There needs to be judicious use and placement of crossings, he says. And, where it makes sense, infrastructure solutions should be used.

 

Fave place to rideWhere’s your favourite place to ride a bike in Auckland?

Jonathan’s favourite route is from Northcote Point taking Akoranga to Lake Rd to Devonport, a loop around the Naval Facility and Ngataringa Sports fields, across to Cheltenham and home. “I prefer to go out early before traffic gets too busy or else I walk the kids to school and head out between 10 and 2 in the afternoon. At the weekend I’ll head out at different times in the day.” The view coming down Vauxhall Road, across Cheltenham Beach to the harbour is one of the best in Auckland, particularly when the sun is rising. It’s a pretty decent loop – we guessed around 30 km – although he is not a telemetry enthusiast: “I just enjoy the ride and it’s great exercise.”


Shanan Halbert – Labour

Shanan Halbert is standing for Labour in the Northcote electorate.

More kids on bikesCurrently only 2% of Kiwi kids ride a bike to school. Is lifting this number a priority? If so, how will we get there?

Yes. It is important to have good infrastructure to support this and reduce any danger by separating people who are cycling from motorised traffic. I was lucky enough to ride to school every day when I was at school and gave me an early understanding of road safety.

 

Bike-friendly citiesWhat would you do to make it easier for Aucklanders (in your electorate, and beyond) to choose bike travel?

Labour will commit more funding to urban cycleways, active neighbourhoods projects and locally the Skypath so that Northcote residents can get active safely and get to where they need to go easily. The Skypath has taken too long to get off the ground and we need to support it to start now.

 

Safer streets

How would you make streets (in your electorate and beyond) safer for everyone who uses them, including those on bikes?

Labour will renew the current Urban cycleways fund $100m for a further 3 years to help support more great projects like the Lightpath and Nelson st cycleway. So more modern cycleways separated from traffic. We will also establish a new ‘Active Neighbourhoods’ fund of $15m to support smaller community led projects in this area. As an example, local schools can create safer areas locally. These initiatives will improve safety in and around our roads.

 

Fave place to rideWhere’s your favourite place to ride a bike in Auckland?

I am a much more active walker to get some exercise and keep healthy. But when the Skypath is built I look forward to being able to cycle from Northcote to Auckland City with friends and whanau.


Rebekah Jaung – GREENS

Rebekah Jaung is running for the Greens in the Northcote electorate.

More kids on bikesCurrently only 2% of Kiwi kids ride a bike to school. Is lifting this number a priority? If so, how will we get there?

Kids on bikes and walking to school is a priorty for the Green party. We have identified safety as a key barrier to kids taking active transport to school. Here is an excerpt of our ‘Safe to Schools’ policy that was announced earlier this year:

We will:
– Reduce the speed limit outside urban schools to a much safer 30 km/h
– Reduce the speed limit outside rural schools to 80 km/h, with the option of a 30km/h limit during drop-off or pick-up times
– Allocate $50m a year for four years to build modern, convenient walking and cycling infrastructure around schools: separating kids and other users from road traffic, giving a safe choice for families
– Get half of kids walking or cycling to school by 2022: reducing congestion; improving health and learning; saving families time and money

 

Bike-friendly citiesWhat would you do to make it easier for Aucklanders (in your electorate, and beyond) to choose bike travel?

The Green Party will:
1. Support the preparation and implementation of national, regional and local Walking and Cycling Strategies.
2. Require NZTA to develop Active Mode Facility and network planning guidelines, and ensure that publicly provided or funded transport information systems include information on walking and cycling options.
3. Encourage local authorities to develop safe and direct walking and cycling routes at a local and regional level, and expand networks of paths connecting streets in urban areas.
4. Require major public investments (such as new hospitals) to ensure that access is pedestrian and cycle friendly with secure cycle parking.
5. Investigate the need for clearer liability for crashes involving active modes so that motorised vehicles involved are liable unless the pedestrian or cyclist has been reckless.
6. Investigate and where possible address the factors that discourage people from cycling.
7. Require all road controlling authorities to have in place plans to support active modes, and specific contact points for walking and cycling issues, within three years, as a condition of funding.
8. Further develop the nationwide network of safe and attractive cycleways using paper roads, road and rail corridors, and reserves as far as possible, where these can be constructed and used without damaging conservation, historic, ecological or wilderness values.
9. Ensure that public transport services are ‘cycle friendly’ as a condition of receiving public funding.
10. Improve cycle safety on the open road by widening roads and creating more cycleways, and increasing driver education.

 

Safer streetsHow would you make streets (in your electorate and beyond) safer for everyone who uses them, including those on bikes?

The Green Party will work towards a transport system that puts the interests of
children, walkers and cyclists first, and will:
1. Improve information and research on children’s transport needs.
2. Ensure transport policy and decision-making fully complies with the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, and ensure that all land transport projects are assessed for their effect on children.
3. Work with schools and communities to make walking and cycling to school a safer and more attractive alternative for children.
4. Enable local communities to request a road design change to address concerns about vehicle speeds and to facilitate safe road crossings, including on state highways.
5. Lower maximum permissible speeds in areas of significant pedestrian traffic, such as routes to schools, hospitals and shopping areas.
6. Expand school bus services, especially in rural, provincial and ‘urban fringe’ areas.

On road safety management, the Green Party will:
1. Provide better rest area facilities and road signs, in areas where fatigue is found to be a major cause of accidents.
2. Ensure better coordination between the NZTA, other road controlling authorities, ACC and the police so that safety issues are integrated into land transport planning and management.
3. Incorporate into transport planning the Vision Zero goal of zero road deaths for people following the road rules.
4. Encourage ‘Traffic calming’ in order to reduce vehicle speed and improve safety.
5. Oppose increases in maximum truckloads and truck lengths.
6. Revise the Road Safety 2010 strategy and associated policy to:
a. Reflect a pro-active approach based on risk compensation theory,
international best practice and innovation in safety engineering.
b. Set targets based on increasing share for walking and cycling as well as focusing on historical accident records.

 

Fave place to ride

Where’s your favourite place to ride a bike in Auckland?

I have really fond memories of first learning how to ride my bike on the school field at Milford Primary School.


Kym Koloni – NZ FIRST

Kym Koloni is standing for NZ First in the Northcote electorate.

More kids on bikesCurrently only 2% of Kiwi kids ride a bike to school. Is lifting this number a priority? If so, how will we get there?

I think cycling and learning to ride a bike has been taken for granted by my age group (49) and we need to bring this exercise and skill back to children at primary school age. We learned road safety and cycle safety as young children and the majority of children used to walk and cycle to school. I would encourage these common sense activities be promoted through our schools again.

 

Bike-friendly citiesWhat would you do to make it easier for Aucklanders (in your electorate, and beyond) to choose bike travel?

All the suggestions you have proposed have my full support. (Note: this answer was given in response to Bike Kaipatiki’s survey, and the suggestions included: cycle lanes on arterial roads, a network of greenways, extending the Urban Cycleways Fund, more bike parking, bikes on buses, learn to ride tracks, and many others).

 

Safer streetsHow would you make streets (in your electorate and beyond) safer for everyone who uses them, including those on bikes?

Due to our population increase, the number of cars on our roads has increased significantly. Life has become busy as people work to earn an income to pay for their rent or mortgage. NZ First wants to limit immigration to 10,000 per annum and allow our infrastructure to improve and catch up. Safety and awareness starting from children up is very important for our continued road safety. Statistics need to be compared as a % of total population.

 

Fave place to ride

Where’s your favourite place to ride a bike in Auckland?

I have loved cycling in the past, but have had my tailbone removed after suffering a fall. I look forward to getting back on a bike in the next couple of years when I can sit on a hard seat again.


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Vote Bike is a Bike Auckland initiative for the 2017 General Election. Authorised by Barbara Cuthbert of 2A St Aubyn St, Devonport, Auckland 0624, on behalf of Bike Auckland, of 2A St Aubyn St Devonport Auckland 0624.